futurenobleaddictions

straightandcrookedthinking:

earthschild:

tennants-hair:

VIVA LA PLUTO MOTHERFUCKERS!!!!

DO YOU SEE THIS? DO YOU? ALL OF YOU WHO HAD WRITTEN OFF PLUTO, WHO HAD CROSSED IT OFF YOUR PLANET LIST? REMEMBER HOW IT WAS ‘TOO SMALL” TO BE A PLANET? HOW NASA, IN COLLABORATION WITH THE INTERNATIONAL ASTRONOMICAL UNION REMOVED ITS PLANETARY STATUS AND  CHANGED ITS NAME TO 134340? HOW EVERYONE THEN CONSIDERED THERE TO BE EIGHT PLANETS, NOT NINE?

BUT SOME OF US REMAINED LOYAL TO PLUTO. IT WAS NEVER FORGOTTEN. AND NOW HERE WE ARE, AND JUSTICE IS UPON US AFTER 8 YEARS.

BECAUSE GUESS WHAT? PLUTO HAS AT LEAST FIVE MOONS, A PRETTY BIG NUMBER FOR A ”DWARF-PLANET”, HUH? ESPECIALLY WHEN EARTH, QUITE BIGGER THAN PLUTO AND AN OFFICIAL PLANET ONLY HAS ONE. AND GUESS WHAT ELSE? ERIS, THE PLANET WHICH EVERYONE THOUGHT TO BE BIGGER THAN PLUTO, MAY NOT BE BIGGER AFTER ALL. AND THE BEST PART IS THAT PLUTO HAS AN ATMOSHPERE. THAT’S RIGHT, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, A SUPPOSEDLY NON-PLANET HAS AN ATMOSPHERE. AGAIN, ISN’T THAT IMPRESSIVE?

SO LOOK AT THIS. NEW FINDINGS, AND A NEW AGE FOR PLUTO. AN AGE OF RECOGNITION AND APPRECIATION. AND ALLOW ME TO CLOSE THIS -somewhat aggressive-PRESENTATION OF OPINION WITH THE MOTTO OF THE PLUTO APOLOGISTS: VIVA LA PLUTO!

Here we have a strong member of the Pluto fandom.

Pluto Isn’t a planet because it crosses orbits with multiple other planets, not because it’s too small.

Also to be classified as a planet it has to clear the space around it.
Earth is larger, but it doesn’t have a million moons because it cleared the space with its gravitational force (that is pre impact that caused the moon)
Pluto doesn’t have the proper size to clear its path.
Thus Pluto doesn’t equal a planet

kai-ni

kai-ni:

Make a new version of my Betta ‘no bowls’ flier to post around the dorms now that I have illustrator to work with but so far I hate the colors 8D Still trying

I need to start making some, every year my colleges science club hands out bettas in beakers. I want to hand them out right next to them

If you know me, then you know I’m an extreme worrier

With an anxiety problem for kicks.
I worry about worrying, but for the first time in a very long time I feel very stress free.
The last two years I’ve been rushing to finish my degree. Managed to graduate debt free, and held a job.
Those are all the things I guess normal people would be content with, but I was miserable the entire time.
I over worked myself, and found the things I should be enjoying were passing away.
So I vowed to myself that I would do things that made me happy.
Some how that turned into transferring schools, taking on $6500 in loans, and quitting my job.
The weirdest thing is that I’m the happiest I’ve been in a long time.
I come to realize that I was completely obsessed with a false idea of success that I was bound to fail at.
I guess I’m really lucky to get the chance to start over.

iranianatheist

iranianatheist:

This is a question that comes up regularly, people ask me about how people of different faiths can get married or be in a relationship. More importantly if someone as an atheist can be in a relationship with a believer.

Well, my opinion has been and will be scrutinized but I can only look at it…

My boyfriend is a theist, and this statement fits perfectly. We don’t always agree, but it’s wonderful to know someone cares so much about you that they don’t need to change you. It actually strengthens our relationship.

I also think that it is very important to create relationships with people who aren’t exactly like you. It broadens your outlook, and helps reduce ignorance and prejudices.

I would hope that all people would not confine themselves to relationships with people just like them. You never know, the people you think you could never like or be like, could be the people you need the most. 

bahnanna

bahnanna:

Okay truth time now:

I was SO HAPPY with the VMAs this year for just a few reasons. Last year, the big craze was over Miley Cyrus twerking and her weird obsession with big butts while she barely has her own.

This year, Beyonce rocked the stage with her curves singing about loving yourself for…

Okay we need to have a talk.

Why, WHY IN THE WORLD would you be okay with body shaming in any form?
If you did not like being shamed for your body why would you shame someone back?

It’s not okay.
It’s not justified.

No woman, not a single one has ever been free from body issues. Skinny or thick we have all been held to body images that aren’t attainable.
It makes me sick when people tell women to:
"go to the gym"
Not wear certain clothes because of their size
Or tell them not to eat.
It also makes me sick when people tell skinny girls that:
"men don’t like skinny girls they want real women"
Skinny girls are fake plastic dolls
That they are all anorexic
Or they need to eat a cheeseburger.

All of these things have been said to me and I WAS ANOREXIC.

Your post is just plain disrespectful. Not just to your sisters but you’re self.

We don’t need to be dividing ourselves in skinny bitches and thick chics. That doesn’t help anything.

We have all stuggled. We have all felt pain, who are you to say who has felt it the most.

I’m disappointed. I think you should take a long hard look at yourself.

Is it really okay to shame others in the name of your own well being.

If you don’t know then the answer is no

werefuckingtimetraveling

werefuckingtimetraveling:

Question for feminists: is it wrong for women to want to be physically attractive to men?

No.
There is nothing wrong in trying to achieve what you believe to be personal beauty in order to attract another.
What’s wrong is believing you have to look, act, or think a certain way to impress someone. You shouldn’t have to change to impress someone, and how you dress definitely shouldn’t be only because you think someone male or female prefers it.
I buy the skimpiest lingere I can find because I know my boyfriend likes it and I like to treat him.
That being said, I don’t always wear it because my world doesn’t always revolve around him and his needs. I wear what I’m comfortable with when I’m confortable and I hope all people can do that.

fishingboatproceeds
fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)
Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.
He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.
Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:
Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.
Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club. 
Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window. 
Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.
Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.
Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 
But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.
And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)

Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.

He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.

Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:

Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.

Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club

Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window

Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.

Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.

Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 

But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.

And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

scalestails

claffodil asked:

I agree with the crying elephant rescued post. It's sort of disrespectful to degrade such amazing and intellectual animals to humans level of emotion. I love the spiritual bond between human and animals, but I do not see them as lower than me or as equal to me. I have to respect the animal and understand how they express safety and discomfort. I don't find it hilarious or saddening when I see animals displaying human behaviour, which is why I love the blog notactuallycute.

scalestails answered:

Totally agreed. I love notactuallycute as well!

scalestails:

red-merle:

Just because animals don’t cry doesn’t mean they don’t experience many of the same emotions we do. They certainly do feel pain, fear, sadness, and grief. It’s well documented that animals have rich emotional lives. 

Yes, I agree! And they don’t show any of them through human responses! (with a few exceptions). For example:

  • Elephants do not cry.
  • When you see a dog smile, 99% of the time it is a stress smile.
  • Hamsters don’t do backflips when they’re happy.
  • Birds aren’t “dancing” when they swipe back and forth against the cage bars.
  • Etc.

Pretty much what I’m saying is animals have their own body language, and we should still empathize with them, even if they’re not using human body language.

I worked at a conservation museum for many years with all sorts of animals from shark and bears to turkeys and turtles.

A big part of my job was animal education. I had a large folder full of details on different species, then I went out into the public with live animals and taught about them.

It was important that I never allowed people to “pet” animals. They could “touch.” animal names were not said, and I constantly repeated the phrase “anything with a mouth can bite.”

That being said, this conversation about animal emotions are ridiculous. Animal emotions are complex, a family friend of mine was recently killed after an elephant matriarch became agitated after the death of her friend. I’ve had birds of prey who prefered me to feed them over anyone else, and I’ve bonded with mountain lions.

We like to forget that as humans we are still mammals, we are from nature, we are animals. The same traits that make us who we are, are found throughout the wild world as well. It is important to recognize the difference between us and our wild counterparts, and it is equally important to stay educated on them as well.

But I feel that it is completely wrong to say that we aren’t equal or that animal emotions are greatly different. We are constantly learning that the way we viewed animal 50 to 60 years ago was completely wrong. They and their emotions are so complex.

I also think giving human qualities to animals can be a good thing. It allows for a more loving relationship between us when we feel we can relate.

Overall their mannerism may not be exactly the same but that doesn’t mean the can’t feel the same, and we shouldn’t be so worked up over the elephant picture.

Get mad over abuse, destruction of wildlife, and poachers. Not the little stuff.